NIDAMED–National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Resources for Health Professionals

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Resources for health professionals from NIDA, the National Institute on Drug Abuse. NIDA is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Its mission is to lead in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction with two key components: (1) strategic support and conduct of research across a broad range of disciplines, and (2) ensuring the rapid and effective dissemination and use of the results of that research to significantly improve prevention, treatment and policy as it relates to drug abuse and addiction.

Helping Patients Who Drink Too Much: Core Curriculum

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From Boston University, the core curriculum Helping Patients Who Drink Too Much is a new, freely available web-based training curriculum geared toward generalist clinicians. This evidence-based curriculum is a tool used for teaching skills for addressing unhealthy alcohol use (e.g. screening, assessment, brief intervention, and referral) in primary care settings, and emphasizes knowledge and skills regarding cross-cultural efficacy. It has been designed to be taught in 45 minute sessions or expanded into longer or multiple sessions. It consists of a power point slide presentation, complete with trainer notes, and three case-based videos demonstrating skills for addressing unhealthy alcohol use in primary care settings. The curriculum has been piloted with target audiences (practicing primary care physicians and physicians in training). In addition, key primary care faculty nationwide are being trained to implement and disseminate the ACT curriculum.

The Addiction Project–HBO Series (2007)

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4 DVD set, 14 part series. The best set of addiction, treatment and recovery information in one place. Recommended as an outstanding way to provide educational on addiction to new patients and family members. Order DVD set from: www.hbo.com/addiction/

Science of Addiction Booklet from NIDA

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A 30 page, easy to read booklet from NIDA published in February 2007. Many colorful pictures, brain scans, receptor actions, etc. PDF is available online, or print version ordered from www.drugabuse.gov/scienceofaddiction. This is a great resource and teaching tool for clinicians, patients and families. We use the booklet for education on the science of addiction, brain changes with substance use, addiction as a brain disease, and hope for recovery. We recommend that physicians familiarize themselves with the booklet and then order a sufficient number of booklets to have in your waiting room for patients to take/review.

NIDA–National Institute on Drug Abuse

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Website for NIDA, the National Institute on Drug Abuse. NIDA is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Its mission is to lead in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction with two key components: (1) strategic support and conduct of research across a broad range of disciplines, and (2) ensuring the rapid and effective dissemination and use of the results of that research to significantly improve prevention, treatment and policy as it relates to drug abuse and addiction.

Narcotics Anonymous

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NA Website

Marijuana Anonymous

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Website for Marijuana Anonymous

Cocaine Anonymous

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CA Website

Co-Dependents Anonymous

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Website for Co-Dependents Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous

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AA Website

Al-Anon and Alateen

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Support for friends and family of addicted persons

Adult Children of Alcoholics

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Website for Adult Children of Alcoholics

NIDA Launches New Substance Abuse Resources to Help Fill Gaps in Medical Education (2009)

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The rigors of medical training sharpen a doctor’s ability to diagnose and treat a wide variety of human afflictions. However, drug abuse and addiction are often insufficiently covered in medical school curricula, despite the fact that drug use affects a wide range of health conditions and drug abuse and addiction are themselves major public health issues. To improve drug abuse and addiction training of future physicians, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health, unveiled (on Nov. 6, 2009) a series of new teaching tools, through its Centers of Excellence for Physician Information Program (NIDA CoEs), at the Association of American Medical Colleges 2009 Annual Meeting’s "Innovations in Medical Education" Exhibit in Boston.

NIAAA Clinician's Guide: How to use (Powerpoint)

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Powerpoint presentation on how to use NIAAA clinician's guides. Download the 18 MB Powerpoint presentation from the NIAAA website.

AA–Involvement and Outcome (2003)

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For the clinician interested in the relationship between AA participation and long term recovery. A study of more than 2000 alcoholic males 1 and 2 years post treatment. Findings are consistent with the hypothesis that AA participation has a positive effect on alcohol-related outcomes. Available (for purchase) as a PDF from the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. J Consult Clin Psychol 2003; 71(2):302-308.

Why Are Drugs Abused By Humans? (2005)

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An easy to read presentation of a talk given by Nora Volkow, MD, Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) in 2005. She addresses neurochemical changes in people who are addicted and questions the relative contributions of chronic drug exposure, effects of genes that predispose persons to become addicted and/or effects of the environment that facilitate the translation of addiction. Read it online at the Psychiatric Times website.Psychiatric Times May 2005; XXII (2).
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